Cure Your Winter Blues With this Green Herb! No, Not that One.

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Winter is a tough time of year, especially in the north east. With less work, more time indoors, less sun, less money, and constant cold, it is all too easy to fall into those darker thoughts.

There are many ways to deal with the winter blues, getting outside more, increasing exercise, etc. But these tasks become difficult without any motivation to stimulate such activities.

Luckily there is one time tested medicine that has been helping mankind conquer the winter blues for 1000’s of years. And better yet, you have almost certainly heard of it before!! St. John’s Wort is a powerful herb that melts winter blues, as quickly as the sun melts the snow (which can vary depending on many factors :P) . In my experience taking St. John’s wort daily can really pull a Jackie Chan on those sad winter feelings.

Several clinical studies place St. John’s wort on par with the pharmaceutical equivalents. Individuals dealing with mild to moderate depression may be able to experience an alleviation of the winter blues, as much and perhaps even more so than prescription antidepressants, and without the same risk of side effects.

In fact St. Johns Wort is so effective that taking the herb with an antidepressant can cause an overdose, so don’t do it!!! St. John’s Wort also has the same effect with blood thinners like aspirin, so be aware.

When I was suffering with depression, I found a standardized supplement of St. Johns wort, immediately (within an hour) brought me a creative spirit I hadn’t felt in years, and I didn’t even expect that to happen.

Don’t take my word for it, St. John’s Wort has been used for literally over 1000 years, and has prompted millions, perhaps even billions to experience its amazing benefits over the decades.

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Photo by Ben White

If you are experiencing the winter blues there is only one herb that can improve your mood, better than the rest. Learn more about what St. Johns Wort can do for you!

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Clinical use of Hypericum perforatum (St John’s wort) in depression: A meta-analysis

Economic evaluation of St. John’s wort (Hypericum perforatum) for the treatment of mild to moderate depression

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Photo by Olia Gozha

 

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The Definitive Guide to Living with Hypothyroidism (Parts 1-3) revised

Hypothyroidism, can be a a complicated condition that is often difficult to deal with. For those fortunate to not be afflicted with the disease yet there are steps you can take to avoid being afflicted with the condition. However for those already afflicted consent fatigue, dry skin, memory lapses and even depression can make it difficult to get through each and every day. What is Hypothyroidism, how can it be prevented, and how can you make life better if you are already diagnosed?

This is a comprehensive guide designed to help anyone looking for information on thyroid disease, in order that they may learn and comprehend exactly what is happening, in the hopes it may aid you in your own recovery. Often hypothyroidism remains misdiagnosed, or totally unnoticed for years, knowing what hypothyroidism is may save you years of misdiagnosis, and prevent you from further suffering.

May this guide benefit your life, and guide you to a healthier life.

Hypothyroidism Explained

What is the Thyroid Gland?

To understand what hypothyroidism is it is important to first know what the thyroid gland is and what it does. The thyroid gland is an endocrine gland that is located at the front of the windpipe, at the front of the neck. The thyroid is made up of 2 lobes.

The cartilage above the thyroid is called the thyroid cartilage, it is the largest cartilage which makes up the larynx, or the voice box. In men the thyroid cartilage is what forms the Adam’s Apple.

Functions of the thyroid gland-

The thyroid gland produces hormones which are then secreted into the blood. From the blood they are carried into every tissue in the body. The thyroid keeps the body warm, helps it utilize energy, and regulates functions of the heart, brain and other organs.

Hormones produced in the thyroid

The two main hormones produced in the thyroid T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (Thyroxine).

T3 and T4 regulate metabolism, heart rate, and body temperature. Calcitonin is also produced in the thyroid and is in charge of regulating the level of phosphate and calcium in the blood.

Thyroid hormone secretion is regulated by a hormone simply called Thyroid Stimulating Hormone or TSH, which is released by the pituitary gland, which is located in your brain. TSH stimulates the production of the T3 and T4 hormones.

Iodine and the hormone production in the thyroid

Iodine is an essential element for producing the hormones that the thyroid produces. Without this element the thyroid can not function properly. Iodine is naturally occurring in seafood, and plants grown in iodine rich soils. Iodine was added to salt in 1924 in the form of potassium iodide. Iodine can also be taken in the form of liquid supplements. Iodine deficiency is one of the largest causes of hypothyroidism.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism simply put is an under active thyroid. The thyroid has stopped producing the amount of hormones needed to regulate functions in the body. There are 3 classes of hypothyroidism subclinical, overt, and central, more on each of those in the diagnosis section.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism-

The symptoms of hypothyroidism can easily be confused with many other illnesses. The most common symptoms are feeling cold, weight gain, fatigue, irregular periods, and dry skin.

Diagnosing hypothyroidism-

Hypothyroidism is diagnosed through blood work tests. The most common test, is done by testing for TSH in the blood. This is considered the best test as elevated levels of thyroid stimulating hormones can suggest that the thyroid is not producing enough hormones, or is not reacting to the TSH as expected. A second TSH test will often follow weeks latter to confirm the diagnosis.

If the blood work reveals elevated TSH levels, often times the doctor will obtain the levels of free T4 is the Blood. Free T4 is simply T4 that is free flowing in the blood and not bound to any proteins. Testing for T3 is discouraged by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). Once the T4 results are received your healthcare provider may make a diagnosis.

Table of Test Results

TSH Levels

T4 Levels

Interpretation

Normal

Normal

Normal Thyroid Function

Normal/Low

Low

Central hypothyroidism

Elevated

Low

Overt hypothyroidism

Elevated

Normal

Sub-clinical hypothyroidism

Note that regulate levels are not necessarily indicative of a healthy thyroid, as central hypothyroidism can occur even when TSH levels are normal.

Other tests may be recommend by different physicians, for example mildly elevated levels of creatine kinase enzyme and liver enzymes in the blood stream have also been attributed to hypothyroidism. Levels of these enzymes normally return to normal when the disease has been fully treated. There are several other pituitary hormones that should also be tested for in cases of overt and sub-clinical HT. This is specifically important, because when hypocortisolism is present, it should be treated prior to beginning thyroid hormone replacement. .

     Central hypothyroidism

Central Hypothyroidism (CH) is the condition of hypothyroidism caused by an under active pituitary or insufficient production of TSH. When TSH levels are in the normal to low range, but T4 levels are low, this an indication of possible central hypothyroidism. CH is caused by many different factors including brain trauma and autoimmune disease, the underlying causes of CH can very greatly. More information on Central Hypothyroidism Here.

     Sub-clinical hypothyroidism

Sub-clinical hypothyroidism SH is the grade of hypothyroidism that arrises when T4 levels are normal, but TSH levels are elevated. This type of hypothyroidism can be caused by Hasimoto’s disease( a type of thyroid inflammation), thyroid hormone resistance, and other forms of thyroiditis (thyroid inflammation caused by autoimmune disorders).

According to PubMed sub-clinical hypothyroidism can evolve into clinical hypothyroidism if left untreated.

    Overt hypothyroidism

Overt hypothyroidism (OH) is the grade of HT that is diagnosed by elevated levels of TSH and low levels of T4.

Preventing Hypothyroidism-

One of the simplest ways to avoid hypothyroidism is to maintain a healthy level of iodine in your diet. Childhood hypothyroidism was once endemic, this was largely eliminated by adding iodine to commonly used foods, such as table salt. Iodine deficiency is certainly the leading cause of hypothyroidism and maintaining a healthy intake of iodine can help you avoid this hypothyroidism. Iodine deficiency is once again on the rise in the west as people intake less salt, and by people seeking to avoid processed food. Be aware of the amount of iodine that is in your diet and supplement if necessary. The American Thyroid Association has a recommendation of 150 micrograms of supplemental iodine daily.

Woman that are pregnant or breastfeeding require almost 67% more iodine than non pregnant women. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) pregnant and breastfeeding women are recommended to take 250 micrograms of iodine daily.

Though Iodine may be the main preventative, there may be several other ways to avoid Hypothroidism in general:

  1. Getting an X-Ray? Ask for a thyroid collar- Each time you need to get an x-ray be sure to ask for a thyroid collar. This collar specifically protects the thyroid from x-ray radiation

  2. Stop smoking!!!  Yep, just another reason to quit smoking. As you well know cigarettes are full of chemicals, and your body does not react well to them. Thiocyanate in particular is dangerous for the thyroid, and may trigger thyroid disease.

  3. Avoid Soy! Soy is not as Healthy as most people think. It can cause autoimmune responses in the body, which if occurring frequently can lead to a variety of autoimmune diseases, including hypothyroidism

  4. Selenium is a Superfood for the Thyroid- Maintaining healthy levels of selenium can prevent thyroiditis and autoimmune diseases associated with some thyroid conditions. Selenium levels are also associated with reduced levels of thyroid antibodies. Brazil nuts are a rare food that is rich in selenium add them to your diet.

  5. Use Potassium Iodide- I can’t state this enough! Potassium iodide is essential to avoiding thyroid disorders. Potassium iodide can also reduce risks of disease in the thyroid from exposure to radiation.

  6. Avoid Fluoride- Fluoride was once commonly used effectively as a treatment for hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), This means it reduces thyroid activity, which is clearly not what you want to happen if you have hypothyroidism.  Fluoride is contained in most bottled and city water, it is also contained in almost all toothpastes and mouth washes.

  1. Do your own Research! It can be all too easy to rely solely on the advice of your doctor, but they are low on time, and may not have the time, or energy to learn all they can on the wide range of conditions they have to deal with on a daily basis. The internet is a great tool and there is a well spring of information at your fingertips. Just be wise about your sources, there is a wealth of information to be found. This article is a good start.

Natural and Clinical Remedies for Hypothyroidism

Clinical Treatments for Hypothyroidism

Before Beginning Hormone Replacement Such as Levothyroxine, Dedicated Thyroid or Cytomel:

According to an abstract from PubMed, patients with central hypothyroidism should have other pituitary hormone levels tested before beginning any hormone treatment begins. More specifically “assessment of the hypothalamic-pituitry-adrenal axis”. This is because if hypocortisolism is present, it needs to be rectified before initiation of hormone treatment.

Levothyroxine

History of Levothyroxine-

Synthroid is a medication that comes in the form of levothyroxine (LT4) in sodium tablets, that has been used since the early 20th century. Crystalline thyroxine (T) was first isolated by biochemist Calvin Kendall of the Mayo Clinic in 1914.

In 1927 experimentation started with extracts from hog thyroids, when George Barger and Charles Harrington synthesized the hormone.

LT4 has been the second most used prescription for the last 10 years.

How Levothyroxine works

LT4 is a synthetic drug, that mimics the T4 hormone. With overt and central hypothyroidism this drug works simply by replacing the hormones your body is not producing.

Some doctors may prescribe T3 hormones as well, these come in the form of Cytomel. There is evidence that suggests LT4 and Cytomel should be taken together.

Interactions

There are medications and supplements can worsen an under-active thyroid. Because of possible interactions Thyroid Advisor recommends taking LT4, four hours apart from any other drug or supplement, to avoid taking away from the effects of LT4. Medications with the effect of lowering the effectiveness of LT4 include sodium polystyrene sulfonate, antacids, colestipol, iron, and calcium supplements.

Your doctor should provide a list of drugs, herbal medicine, and non-prescription products that may interact with LT4. Some of these include but are not limited to blood thinners, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and digoxin.

Side effects

Side effects with LT4 like most other medications do occur.

Hair loss

When you begin to take LT4, hair loss may occur as your body adjusts to the hormones, typically this is only temporary, but may also continue indefinitely.

Continued Effects of Hypothyroidism

If your body still struggles with low hormone levels after taking LT4, symptoms of hypothyroidism will likely still present themselves. Sore muscles, weight gain, slowed heartbeat, fatigue, weight gain, etc.

Too Much Thyroid Hormone

Some instances of hyperthyroidism have occurred as a side effect of taking LT4. This happens when your body does not adjust properly to the higher levels of hormones in the body. Symptoms include; mood swings, headaches, shaking and sweating. More extreme conditions may occur that would require medical attention, these symptoms are swelling, chest pain, irregular heart beats and seizures.

Allergies

Allergies occur, but rarely.

Cytomel

History of Cytomel

Like T4 and Levothyroxine, the history of Cytomel began with the early discoveries of Calvin Kendall’s isolation of the T hormone in 1914.

T3 was first discovered and synthesized in 1952 by Rosalind Pitt-Rivers and Jack Gross. They confirmed that this compound was more active than T and in 1956 the FDA approved liothyronine, synthetic T3.

How Cytomel Works

Just as LT4 works by replacing T4 levels in the thyroid, Cytomel simply works by replacing the missing T3 hormone in those afflicted with hypothyroidism.

There is a bit of controversy as to what the best drug for hypothyroidism is. Though the main of the medical industry finds that LT4 alone is sufficient for treating hypothyroidism, there is a debate as to whether Cytomel is better, or should be taken with LT4.

Though the body can normally convert T4 into T3, in those with hypothyroidism this may no longer be true.

T3 is more active than T4, and may have a greater effect on those with hypothyroidis.

Interactions

Serious interactions can arise from medications that affect iodine in the body or radioactive iodine in general.

More common interactions can occur with drugs such as blood thinners and others, be sure to get a full list from your doctor.

Cytomel can also interact with conditions like diabetes, seizures, thyrotoxicosis, adrenal insufficiency, and cardiovascular disease.

Side Effects

Like with LT4 hair loss can occur, but it is usually temporary while your body adjusts to the hormones. Other side effects are largely the same as with T4

Side effects largely arise from having thyroid hormone levels that are too high including headaches, mood changes, sensitivity to heat, diarrhea, menstrual changes, and increased sweating. Allergies do occasionally occur.

Desiccated Thyroid

History

George Murray introduced the first recorded preparation of desiccated (DT) thyroid. One of his patients was suffering from Myxedema, a severe form of hypothyroidism. By making an extract of a sheep’s thyroid and pounding it into a powder, he was able to inject it into his patient.

The effect was not immediate, but her symptoms did soon disappear, and she continued treatment for 52 more years til’ passing at the age of 91.

His findings spurred a use in animal extracts to treat hypothyroidism around the world.

Because of the high cost of vaccines and the requirement of a doctors assistance to administer, soon manufacturers developed tablets of DT powder instead.

More on the History HERE.

Sources of Dedicated Thyroid

It is suspected that porcine (pig) derived DT is stronger than that of bovine (cow) or sheep. I however will insert my religious views here, touching the body of a dead pig, much less eating one is forbidden in any major religion, and is specifically advised against in Bible, Torah and Koran. It is my religious assertion that you should see if bovine or sheep DT works for you, and many people do.

If you decide DT is for you give Throvanz a try, it is a DT derived from cows in New Zealand whose cows are pasture raised and free from growth hormones. Thyrovanz is available here.

Interactions and Side Effects

As with any other medicine or supplements be sure to consult with your health care provider, especially if you are medications. Side effects are largely similar to LT4 and Cytomel.

Most interactions occur with other thyroid medications are caused by too much thyroid hormone.

Allergies do sometimes occur.

Herbs With Thyroid Healing Properties

Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha also known as Indian Ginseng is an adaptogenic herb. It stands 2 to 3 feet tall, and produces green flowers which give way to orange berries.

One of the herbs of Ayurvedic medicine, Ashwagandha has a long history of use. It has been used to alleviate stress, boost the immune system, and promote sleep.

Ashwagandha may be an effective herbal remedy for helping alleviate hyperthyroidism. Its properties can balance hormone production of the thyroid. As an adaptogenic herb, Ashwagandha can balance hormones in an under active thyroid, and has properties that can balance hormones in those with hyperthyroidism as well.

Ashwagandha has a proven to be able to stimulate the production of T4. In 2014, a study conducted of 60 patients suffering from bipolar disorder found that Ashwagandha increased production of T4 and stabilized levels of TSH.

Besides its ability to stimulate T4 production, scientists also believe that Ashwagandha can help those suffering from hyperthyroidism by alleviating inflammation, improving mood and its nervine (nerve protecting) properties.

Bacopa

Bacopa Monnieri, is an aquatic herb also known as Water Hyssop. Growing in all tropical and subtropical regions, it is mostly found in Asia. Bacopa is an Ayuvedic herb and was considered to be a tonic for the nerves and brain.

Despite many studies and a long history of use, the active compounds have yet to be found. This however should not diminish the results. Research has shown that it has the ability to regenerate tissue, has a positive effect on the brain and may improve memory, and may inhibit degeneration from Alzheimers disease.

In a study on mice was held produced to test 3 herbs abilities to increase or decrease thyroid activity. It was found that Bacopa increased concentrations of T4 by 41%. This study shows that there is promise in using this herb in cases of hypothyroidism.

Bladderwrack

More commonly known as Kelp, Bladderwrack may be beneficial to those with hypothyroidism. Commonly used to treat thyroid disorders in pill form, kelp is typically taken in capsule, at 600 mg per day, with food and water.

Kelp has shown an ability to counteract the weight gain associated with hyperthyroidism, by helping you to lose weight.

One thing is undeniable about kelp, and that is its high levels of Iodine. Kelp is one of the most abundant sources of natural iodine available. Iodine as mentioned throughout this guide, is essential for proper thyroid function. However, iodine is only beneficial in preventing hypothyroidism, and cases of hypothyroidism with iodine deficiency. Too much iodine can actually cause hypothyroidism.

Kelp can also alleviate inflammation in the thyroid through using a complex carbohydrate known as fucoidan. Fucodian is a strong anti- inflammatory used in many medications, including those for broken bones and sore muscles.

Coleus Forskohlii

Also known as Plectranthus barbatus, is a member of the mint family and has a long history in Asian medicine. Coleus has been shown to increase thyroid production and stimulates hormone release.The main compound found to be responsible for these effects is called forskolin.

Clinical research has shown that forskolin increases a protein called Cyclic AMP. Cyclic AMP is messenger protein which helps in regulating several processes in the body. Cyclic AMP also stimulates thyroid function by signaling to the pituitary and hypothalamus to release TRH and TSH. Increased levels of forskolin have also been found to increase fat loss among other things, including increased energy, decreased risk of blood clotting, relaxation of arteries, and inhibition of platelet activation.

Guggul

Is a a resin which is extracted from the bark of a tree called comminphora wightii, which grows in Norther Africa and Asia. This resing has compounds which hasve been shown to add the throid gland.

A phytochemical called guggulsterone has been shown to improve thyroid function. A study published in a journal called Planta Medica, the 1984 study on rats, found that guggulsterone increased the thyroids ability to uptake iodine. The compound also enhanced thyroid peroxidase and protease.

Herbs to Alleviate Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Turmeric

Turmeric is a yellow herb that is in the ginger family, and has healing benefits for a variety of issues. Traditionally used in Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has an aspirin like compound called currcumin. Currcumin is a powerful anti-inflammatory, that is also mildly pain relieving, and can prevent clotting in the blood by thinning it out. Turmeric is great for all around health and may make the lives of someone that is afflicted with hypothyroidism a bit less painful, until the thyroid hormones balance back out.

Dr. Izabella suggests that Turmeric can benefit those with Hashimoto’s. Inflammation is a condition that is always present in Hashimoto’s. Gut health permeability has been found as a common factor in all autoimmune diseases. There are also cases of Hashimoto’s caused by heavy metal toxicity. Not only does Turmeric provide anti-inflammatory properties, it has been used to improve gut health for 1000’s of years, and may also help to detoxify heavy metals from the body.

Panax Ginseng

Panax ginseng, or Korean ginseng is well known for its amazing benefits including boosting levels of energy, supporting the immune system and boosting overall health. Panax ginseng may improve the daily lives of those with hypothyroidism. Though no specific studies link Panax to stimulated thyroid hormone production at this time, it is thought to promote overall thyroid health, and may prevent hypothyroid disorders before they start.

Panax can help those with hypothyroidism by providing a boost in energy and strengthening the overall body. This enables the body to deal with stress, and other immune disorders, more efficiently.

St. John’s Wort

Depression and lack of motivation are often associated with hypothyroidism, caused by a slowed metabolism. St. Johns Wort has a long history of helping people through rough times. St. John’s wort has clinically proven in several studies to be as effective as several antidepressants when used in those with mild to moderate depression, and with out the same side effects.

St. Johns Wort works by boosting serotonin production in the brain, and is very effective. But be aware of potential interactions with other medications, and the potential for serotonin syndrome.

Supplements and Thyroid Function

Iodine

The most essential nutrient for thyroid function. More on Iodine here. Be mindful, too much Iodine can lead to worsening Hypothyroidism.

Selenium

The thyroid contains more selenium than any other organ in the body, and it helps with hormone production. In the process of making thyroglubulin, a protein used in the production of T4, the thyroid produces free radicals. In order to counteract these free radicals two enzymes are required; thioredoxin and glutathione peroxide. There enzymes require selenium to be produced. Your body produces over 25 of these enzymes using selenium, these enzymes are called selenoproteins. 3 of these enzymes are required to activate T4 which is biologically inactive, one is used to turn T4 into T3. Some of these enzymes assist in brain functioning. There is no established dosage of selenium, but most doctors recommend 55 -100 mcgs, but many nutritionists naturopathic doctors feel that 200-300 mcg is better. More on establishing dosage here.

Folate/ Folic Acid

Contrary to common beliefs, there is no causative link between folate and hypothyroidism, there are however other risks that those with HT may have if they do not maintain proper levels of activated folate. In individuals with normal functions folate, or folic acid is converted in the liver to L-methylfolate, which is the active folate form. Hypothyroidism causes a decrease in enzyme activity of methlenetetrahyrofolate reductase, which is used in the liver to produce L-metylfolate. Low activated folate causes excess levels of homocysteine, which is linked to increased risk of heart disease in individuals with hypothyroidism. It may be beneficial

B-12

Most people in general have low levels of B-12, and this is no exception for those with HT. Updates later.

Food remedies for hypothyroidism

Do Not Eat Soy Products

There is a lot of debate about the effect soy’s various compounds Most people believe that soy is harmless and even healthful. Perhaps in general infrequent use of soy will not harm you, but in general it is dangerous to assume that daily soy consumption will not lead to health issues, especially if you are suffering from an autoimmune disease like hypothyroidism. There are several compounds that raise concern with persistent intake of soy. The two most controversial of these compounds are protease (protein) enzyme inhibitors, phytoestrogens and goitrogens. Each of this could possibly raise concern, in particular if you have hypothyroidism, or an autoimmune disease. Though there likely isn’t much to worry about with using soy products on occasion there can certainly be certain complications that could arise from frequent use.

Phytoestrogens (PE) are plant based estrogens that cause a lot of controversy or should a say controverSOY. Most studies however suggest that there isn’t much of an effect from these estrogens in men or women, as these estrogen are much weaker than human estrogen. However one study raises alarming concern, particularly if you are already afflicted with hypothyroidism.

This study on the effect of women with subclinical, and was made of 60 participants. Each of the participants took either the equivalent amount of phytoestrogen in the standard western diet (30g soy protein with 2 mg of PE), or the soy estrogen equivalent in a vegetarian diet (30g of soy with 16 mg of PE). After eight weeks the participants switched the dosages for 8 more weeks, after an 8 week wash period. It was found that the participants had a 3 fold chance of developing overt HT, as 6 women developed overt HT after the 16 mg PT intake period. To be clear the amount of soy required to intake 16 mg of PT daily is less than 3 ounces of tofu, or 2/3 a cup of soy milk. Take a look at the table below to see just how little soy is required to increase your risk of worsening HT.

Table of Phytoestrogen Levels in Soy Products

Soy Product

Serving

Total PE (mg)

Soy Protein, water based

3.5 ounces

102

Miso

½ cup

59

Soybeans cooked

½ cup

47

Tempeh

3 ounces

37

Soy milk

1 cup

30

Tofu

3 ounces

20

Goitrogens are substances that interfere with iodine uptake in the thyroid, these trigger the pituitary gland to produce Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH). This stimulation increase production of the thyroid and can eventually lead to a goiter or thyroid growth. Though not directly linked to HT it is best not to interfere with thyroid hormones unnecessarily.

Protease inhibitors these inhibitors block enzymes produced in your pancreas from digesting the soy protein. This means your body must work harder to digest the soy, in healthy individuals that eat soy from time to time, this is likely not an issue, but constant intake of these inhibitors can certainly compromise the bodies health, especially in those already afflicted with autoimmune diseases like HT.

Soy is always touted as a health food, but many people believe it may be harmful. Though there is a lot to consider about soy consumption one thing is certain, those with HT should not consume soy, or consume it as little as possible. All in all it is best to absolutely avoid soy in general, especially if you are dealing with HT, find an alternative and its not worth the risk.

Lifestyle remedies for hypothyroidism

Yoga and Hypothyroidism

Off the bat, no yoga doesn’t reverse hypothyroidism, but it has been found in two studies to help those with HT to alleviate their symptoms.

One study on 20 women with HT who attended 1 hour of yoga each day, for one month. Quality of life scores were taken before and after treatment the treatment. The result was a significant improvement in the quality of life, and the patients perceptions of their quality of life.

“It can be concluded that yoga is valuable in helping the hypothyroid patients to manage their disease-related symptoms.” STUDY HERE

A second study was conducted once again on 20 patients. This studies aim was to find the effect prarnayama yoga had on the respiratory functions in people with hypothyroid disorders. Yoga was practiced 45 minutes a day for 6 months. The study concluded that pulmonary functions were improved at the end of the study.

Citations-

  1. “Synthroid/Levothyroxine Complete Overview – History, Usage, Dosage, Interactions, Side Effects.” Thyroid Advisor, 15 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/synthroid-and-levothyroxine-complete-overview/.
  2. “Cytomel Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing.” WebMD, WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-7715/cytomel-oral/details.
  3. “Cytomel: History, Medical Use, Dosage, Side Effects and More.” Thyroid Advisor, 22 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/cytomel-history-medical-use-dosage-side-effects/.
  4. Wentz, Dr. Izabella, et al. “Turmeric For Your Thyroid and Hashimoto’s – Dr. Izabella Wentz.” DR. IZABELLA WENTZ, PHARM D, 27 July 2017, thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/turmeric-for-your-thyroid-and-hashimotos/.
  5. “Synthroid/Levothyroxine Complete Overview – History, Usage, Dosage, Interactions, Side Effects.” Thyroid Advisor, 15 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/synthroid-and-levothyroxine-complete-overview/.
  6. “Cytomel Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing.” WebMD, WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-7715/cytomel-oral/details.
  7. “Cytomel: History, Medical Use, Dosage, Side Effects and More.” Thyroid Advisor, 22 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/cytomel-history-medical-use-dosage-side-effects/.
  8. Wentz, Dr. Izabella, et al. “Turmeric For Your Thyroid and Hashimoto’s – Dr. Izabella Wentz.” DR. IZABELLA WENTZ, PHARM D, 27 July 2017, thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/turmeric-for-your-thyroid-and-hashimotos/.
  9. “Thyrotropin-Releasing hormone.” Wikipedia, Wikimedia Foundation, 5 Jan. 2018, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thyrotropin-releasing_hormone.
  10. Tripathi, Y B, et al. “Thyroid Stimulating Action of Z-Guggulsterone Obtained from Commiphora mukul.” Planta medica., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Feb. 1984, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17340256.
  11. “Hypothyroidism – Penn State Hershey Medical Center.” Penn State Hershey Health Information Library, pennstatehershey.adam.com/content.aspx?productId=10&pid=10&gid=000038.
  12. Swami, G, et al. “Effect of yoga on pulmonary function tests of hypothyroid patients.” Indian journal of physiology and pharmacology., U.S. National Library of Medicine, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21046920.
  13. Singh, P, et al. “The impact of yoga upon female patients suffering from hypothyroidism.” Complementary therapies in clinical practice., U.S. National Library of Medicine, Aug. 2011, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21742277.

The Origin of Disease in Cherokee Tradition, and Several Plants of Significance

as transcribed from
The Sacred Formulas of the Cherokees The 7th annual report
of the Bureau of Ethnology
to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution
1885-’86
By: James Mooney

Myth of the Origin of Disease and Medicine

In the old days quadrupeds, birds, fishes, and insects could all talk, and they and the human race lived together in peace and friendship. But as time went on the people increased so rapidly that their settlements spread over the whole earth and the poor animals found themselves to be cramped for room. This was bad enough, but to add to their misfortunes man invented bows, knives, blowguns, spears, and hooks, and began to slaughter the larger animals, birds and fishes for the sake of their flesh and skins, while the smaller creatures such as the frogs and worms, were crushed and trodden upon without mercy, out of pure carelessness or contempt. In this state of affairs the animals resolved to consult upon measures for their common safety.

The bears were the first to meet in council in their town house Kuwa’hĭ “Mulberry Place”1, and the old White Bears chief presided. After each in turn made complaint against the way in which man had killed their friends, devoured their flesh and used their skin for his own adornment, it was unanimously decided to begin war at once against the human race. Some one asked what weapons man had used to accomplish their destruction. “Bows and arrows, of course,” cried all the bears in chorus. “And what are they made of?” was the next question. “The bow of wood and the string of our own entrails,” replied one of the bears. It was then proposed that they make some bows and arrows and see if they could not turn man’s weapons against himself. So one bear got a nice piece of locust wood and another sacrificed himself for the good of the rest in order to furnish a piece of his entrails for the string. But when everything was ready and the first bear stepped up to make the trial it was found that in letting the arrow fly after drawing back the bow, his long claws caught the string and spoiled the shot. This was annoying, but another suggested that he could overcome the difficulty by cutting his claws, which was accordingly done, and on a second trial it was found that the arrow went straight to the mark. But here the chief, the old White Bear, interposed and said that it was necessary that they should have long claws in order to be able to climb trees. “One of us has already died to furnish the bowstring, and if we now caught of our claws we shall all have to starve together. It is better to trust to the teeth and claws which nature has given us, for it is evident that man’s weapons were not intended for us.”

No one could suggest any better plan, so the old chief dismissed the council and the bears dispersed to their forest haunts without having concerted any means for preventing the increase of the human race. Had the result of the council been otherwise, we should now be at war with the bears, but as it is the hunter does not even ask the bears pardon when he kills one.

The deer next help a council under their chief, the Little Deer, and after some deliberation resolved to inflict rheumatism upon every hunter that killed one of their number, unless he took care to ask their pardon for the offense. They sent notice of their decision to the nearest settlement of Indians and told them at the same time how to make a propitiation when necessity forced them to kill one of their deer tribe. Now, whenever the hunter brings down a deer, the Little Deer, who is swift as the wind and can not be wounded, runs quickly up to the spot and bending over the blood stains asks the spirit of the deer if it has heard the prayer of the hunter for pardon. If the reply be “Yes” all is well and the Little Deer goes on his way, but if the reply be in the negative he follows on the trails of the hunter, guided by the blood on the ground, until he enters invisibly and strikes the neglectful hunter with rheumatism, so that he is now rendered on the instant a helpless cripple. No hunter who has regard for his health fails to ask for pardon of the deer for killing it, although some who have not learned the proper formula may attempt to turn aside the Little Deer from his pursuit by building a fire behind them in the trail.

Next came the fishes and reptiles, who had their own grievances against humanity. They held a joint council and determined to make their victims dream of snakes twining about them n slimy folds and blowing their fetid breath in their faces, or to make them dream of eating raw or decaying fish, so that they would lose appetite, sicken and die. Thus it is that snake and fish dreams are accounted for.

Finally the birds, insects and smaller animals came together for a like purpose, and the Grubworm presided over their deliberations. It was decided that each in turn should express an opinion and then vote on the question as to whether or not man should be deemed guilty. Seven votes were to be sufficient to condemn him. One after another denounced man’s cruelty and injustice toward the other animals and voted in favor of his death. The Frog (walâ’sĭ) spoke first and said: “We must do something to check the increase of the race or people will become so numerous that we shall be crowded from the earth. See how man has kicked me about because I am ugly, as he says, until my back is covered with sores;”and here he showed the spots on his skin. Next came the Bird (tsi’skwa: no particular species indicated), who condemned man because “he burns my feet off,” alluding to the way in which the hunter barbecues birds by impaling them on a stick set over the fire, so that their feathers and tender feet are singed and burned. Others followed in the same strain. The Ground Squirrel alone ventured to say a word in behalf of man, who seldom hurt him because he was small; but this so enraged the others that they fell upon the Ground Squirrel and tore him with their teeth and claws, and the stripes remain on his back to this day.

The assembly then began to devise and name various diseases, one after another, and had not their invention finally failed them not one of the human race would have been able to survive. The Grubworm in his place of honor hailed each new malady with delight, until at last they had reached the end of the list, when some one suggested that it be arranged that it be arranged that menstruation sometimes be fatal to women. On this he rose up in his place and cried: “Wata’n! Thanks! I’m glad some of them will die, for they are getting so thick that they tread on me.” He fairly shook with joy at the thought, so that he fell over backward and could not get on his feet again, but had to wriggle off on his back, as the Grubworm has done ever since.

When the plants, who were friendly to man, heard what had been done by the animals, they determined to defeat their evil designs. Each tree, shrub, and herb, down even to the grasses and mosses, agreed to furnish a remedy for some one of the diseases named, and each said “I shall appear to help man when he calls upon me in his need.” Thus did medicine originate, and the plants, every one of which has its uses if we only knew it, furnish the antidote to counteract the evil wrought by the revengeful animals. When the doctor is in doubt what treatment to apply for the relief of a patient, the spirit of the plant suggest to him the proper remedy.

THEORY OF DISEASE—ANIMALS, GHOSTS, WITCHES.

Such is the belief upon which their medical practice is based, and whatever we may think of the theory it must be admitted that the practice is consistent in all its details with the views set forth in the myth. Like most “primitive”* people the Cherokees believe that disease and death are not natural, but are due to the evil influence of animal spirits, ghosts, or witches. Haywood, writing in 1823, states on the authority of two intelligent resident of the Cherokee nation:

“In ancient times the Cherokees had no conception of anyone dying a natural death. The universally ascribed the death of those who perished be disease to the intervention or agency of evil spirits and witches and conjurers who had connection with the Shina (Anisgi’na) or evil spirits. *** A person dying by disease and charging his death to have been procured be means of witchcraft or spirits, by any other person, consigns that person to inevitable death. They profess to believe that their conjurations have no effect upon the white men”1

On the authority of one of the same informants, he also mentions the veneration which “their physicians have for the numbers four and seven nights were instituted for the cure of diseases in the human body and the seventh night as the limit for female impurity.2

Viewed from a scientific standpoint, their theory and diagnosis are entirely wrong, and consequently we can hardly expect their therapeutic system to be correct. As the learned Doctor Berendt states, after an exhaustive study of medicine books of Mayas, the scientific value of their remedies is “next to nothing”. It must be admitted that many of the plants used in their medical practice possess real curative properties, but it is equally true that many others held in as high estimation are inert. It seems probable that in the beginning the various herbs and other plants were regarded as so many fetiches and were selected from some fancied connection with the disease animal, according to the idea known to modern folklorists as the doctrine of signatures. Thus at the present day the doctor puts into the decoction intended as a vermifuge some of the red fleshy stalks of the common purslane or chickweed (Portulaca oleracea), because those stalks somewhat resemble worms and consequently must have some occult influence over worms. Here the chick weed is a fetich precisely as is the flint arrow head which is put into the same decoction, in order that in the same mysterious manner its sharp cutting qualities may be communicated to the liquid and enable it to cut the worms into pieces. In like manner, biliousness is called by the Cherokees dalâ’nî* or “yellow,’ because the most apparent symptom of the disease is the vomiting by the patient of yellow bile, and hence the doctor selects for the decoction four different herbs, each of which is called dalânî*, because of the color of the root, stalk, or flower. The same idea is carried out in the tabu which generally accompanies the treatment. Thus a scrofulous patient must abstain from eating meat of a turkey, because the fleshy dewlap which depends from its throat somewhat resembles an inflamed scrofulous eruption. On killing a deer the hunter always makes an incision in the hindquarter and removes the hamstring, because this tendon, when served, draws up into the flesh; ergo, any one who should unfortunately partake of the hamstring would find his limbs draw up in the same manner.

There can be no doubt that in course of time a haphazard use of plants would naturally lead to the discovery that certain herbs are efficacious in certain combination of symptoms. These plants would thus come into more frequent use and finally would obtain general recognition I the Indian materia medica. By such a process of evolution an empiric system of medicine has grown up among the Cherokees, by which they are able to treat some classes of ailments with some degree of success, although without any intelligent idea of the process involved. It must be remembered that our own medical system has its remote origin in the same mythic conception of disease, and that within two hundred years judicial courts have condemned women to be burned to death for producing sickness by spells and incantations, while even at the present day our faith-cure professors reap their richest harvest among people supposed to belong to the intelligent classes. In the treatment of wounds the Cherokee doctors exhibit a considerable degree of skill, but as far as any internal ailment is concerned the average farmer’s wife is worth all the doctors in the whole tribe.

The faith of the patient has much to do with his recovery, for the Indian has the same implicit confidence in the shaman that a child has in a more intelligent physician. The ceremonies and prayers are well calculated to inspire this feeling, and the effect thus produced upon the mind of the sick man undoubtably reacts favorably upon his physical organization.

Selected List of Plants and their Uses in Cherokee Tradition

The following list of twenty plants is used in Cherokee practice will give a better idea of the extent of their medical knowledge than could be conveyed in a lengthy dissertation. The names are given in the order in which they occur in the botanical notebook filled on the reservation, excluding names of food plants and species not identified, so that no attempt has been made to select in accordance with a preconceived theory. Following the name of each plant are given its uses as described by the Indian doctors, together with its properties as set forth in the United States Dispensatory, one of the leading pharmacopœias in use in this country.4 For the benefit of those not versed in medical phraseology it may be stated that aperient, cathartic, and deobstruent are terms applied to medicines intended to open or purge the bowels, a diuretic has the property of exciting the flow of urine, a diaphoretic excites perspiration, and a demulcent protects or soothes irritated tissues, while hæmophytes denotes a peculiar variety of blood-spitting and aphthous in an adjective applied to ulcerations of the mouth.

    1. Unaste’tstiyû = “very small roots” – Aristolochia serpentaria – Virginia or black snakeroot: Decoction of root blown upon patient for fever and feverish headache, and drunk for coughs; root chewed and spit upon wound to cure snake bites; bruised root placed in hollow tooth for toothache, and held against the nose made sore by constant blowing from colds. Dispensatory : “A stimulant tonic, acting also as a diaphoretic or diuretic, according to the mood of application: *** also been highly recommended in intermittent fevers, and though itself generally inadequate to cure often proves serviceable as an adjunct to Peruvian bark or sulphate of Quinia.” Also used for typhous diseases, in dyspepsia, as a gargle for sore throat, as a mild stimulant for typhoid fevers, and to promote eruptions. Th genus derives its scientific name from its supposed efficacy in promoting menstrual discharge, and some species have acquired the “reputation of antidotes for the bites of serpents.”
    2. Unistil’ûnistÎĭ1= “they stick on” – Cynoglossum Morrisoni Beggar lice; Decoction of root or top drunk for kidney troubles; bruised root used with bear oil on skin as an ointment for cancer; forgetful persons drink a decoction of this plant, and probably also of other similar bur plants, from the idea that the sticking qualities of the burrs will thus be imparted to the memory. From a similar connection of ideas the root is also used in the preparation of love charms. Dispensatory: Not named. C. officinale “ has been used as a demulcent and sedative in coughs, catarrh, spitting of blood, dysentery, and diarrhea, and has been also applied externally to burns, ulcers, scrofulous tumors and goiter.”
    3. Ûnnagéi = “black” – Cassia Marilandica – Wild senna: Root bruised and moistened with water for poulticing sores: decoction drunk for fever and for a disease called Ûnnagéi, or “black” (same name as plant), in which the hands and eye sockets are said to turn black; also for a disease described as similar to Ûnnagéi, but more dangerous, in which the eye sockets turn black, while spots appear on the arms, legs, and over the ribs on one side of the body, accompanied by partial paralysis, and resulting in death should the black spots also appear on the other side. Dispensatory: Described as “an efficient and safe cathartic, *** most conveniently given in the form of infusion.”
    4. Kâsd’úta = “simulating ashes,” so called on account of the appearance of the leaves- Gnaphalium decurrensLife everlasting: Decoction drunk for colds; also used in the sweat bath for various diseases and considered one of their most valuable medical plants. Dispensatory: Not named. Decoctions of two other species of this genus are mentioned as used by country people for the chest and bowel diseases, and for hemorrhages, bruises, ulcers, etc., although “probably possessing little medicinal value.”
    5. Altsa’sti = “a wreath for the head” – Vicia Carolinia Vetch: Decoction drunk for dyspepsia and pains in the back, and rubbed on stomach for cramp; also rubbed on ball-players after scratching, to render their muscles tough, and used in the same way after scratching in the disease refereed to under Ûnnagéi, in which one side becomes black spots, with partial paralysis; also used in same manner in decoction with Kâsd’úta for rheumatism; considered one of their most valuable medicinal herbs. Dispensatory: non named.
    6. Distai’yĭ = “they (the roots) are tough” – Tephrosia Virginiana – Catgut, Turkey Pea, Goat’s Rue, or Devil’s Shoestrings: Decoction drunk for lassitude. Women wash their hair in decoction of roots to prevent its breaking or falling out, because the roots are very tough and hard to break; from the idea ball-players rub the decoction on their limbs after scratching, to toughen them. Dispensatory: Described as a cathartic with roots tonic and aperient.
    7. U’ga-atasgi’skĭ = “ the pus oozes out” – Euphorbia hypericifolia Milkweed: Juice rubbed on skin for skin eruptions, especially children’s heads; also used as a purgative; decoction drunk for gonorrhœa and similar diseases in both sexes, and held in high estimation for this purpose; juice used as an ointment for sores and sore nipples, and in connection with other herbs for cancer. Dispensatory: The juice of all of the genus has the property of “powerfully irrigating the skin when applied to it,” while nearly all are powerful emetics and cathartics. This species “has been highly commended as a remedy in dysentery after due depletion, diarrhea, menorrhagia, and leucorrhea.”
    8. Gȗnĭgwalĭ’skĭ = “It becomes discolored when bruised” – Scutellaria lateriflora Skullcap. “The name refers to the red juice which comes out of the stalk when bruised or chewed. A decoction of the four varieties of Gȗnĭgwalĭ’skĭ – S. lateriflora, S. Pilosa, Hypericum corymbosum, and Stylostanthes eliatio – is drunk to promote menstruation, and the same decoction is also drunk and used as a wash to counteract the ill effects of eating food prepared by a woman in the menstrual condition, or when such woman by chance comes into a sick room or a house under the tabu; also drunk for diarrhea and used with other herbs in decoction for chest pains. Dispensatory: This plant “produces no very obvious effects,” but some doctors regard it as possessed of nervine, antispasmodic, and tonic properties. None of the other three species are name.
    9. Kȃ’ga Skȗntagĭ = “crow shin” – Adiantum pedatum Maidenhair Fern : Used either in decoction or poultice for rheumatism and chills, generally in connection with some other fern. The doctors explain the the fronds of the different varieties of fern are curled up in the young plant, but unroll and straighten out as it grows, and consequently a decoction of ferns causes the contracted muscles of the rheumatic patient to unbend and straighten out in the like manner. It is also used as decoction for fever. Dispensatory: The leaves “have been supposed to be useful in chronic catarrh and other pectoral affections.”
    10. Anda’nkalagi’skĭ = “it removes things from gums” – Geranium maculatumWild alum, Cranesbill: Used in decoction with Yânû Unihye stĭ (Vitis cordifolia) to wash the mouths of children in thrush; also used alone for the same purpose by blowing the chewed fiber into the mouth. Dispensatory: “One of our best indigenous astringents. *** Diarrhea, chronic dysentery, cholora infantum in the latter stages, and the various hemorrhages are the forms of disease in which it is most commonly used.” Also valuable as “an application to indolent ulcers, an injection in gleet and leucorrhea, a gargle in relaxation of the uvula and aphthous ulcerations of the throat.” The other plant sometimes used with it is not mentioned.
    11. Ûnlê Ukĭ’ltĭ = “the locust frequents it” – Gillenia trifoliata – Indian Physic. Two doctors state that it is good as a teas for bowel complaints, with fever and yellow vomit; but another says it is poisonous and that no decoction is ever drunk, but that it is a good poultice for swellings. Dispensatory: “Gillenia is a mild and efficient emetic, and like most substances belonging to the same class occasionally acts upon the bowels. In very small doses it has been though to be tonic.”
    12. Skwa’lĭ = hepiatica acutiloba – Liverwort, Heartleaf: Used coughs either in tea or by chewing root. Those who dream of snakes drink a decoction of this herb and I’natȗ Ga’n’ka = “snake tongue” (Camptosorus rhizophyllus or Walking Fern) to produce vomiting, after which the dreams will not return. The traders buy large quantities of liverwort from the Cherokees, who may thus have learned to esteem it more highly than they otherwise would. The appearance of the other plant, Camptosorus rhizophyllus, has evidently determined its Cherokee name and the use to which it is applied. Dispensatory: “Liverwort is a very mil demulcent tonic and astringent , supposed by some to posses diuretic and deobstruent virtues. It was formerly used in Europe in various complaints, especially chronic hepatic affections, but has fallen into entire neglect. In this country, some years since, it acquired considerable reputation, which, however, it has not maintained as a remedy in hæmoptysis and chronic coughs.” The other plant is not named.
    13. Da’yewȗ = “it sews itself up,” because the leaves are said to grow together again when torn – Cacalia atriplicifolia Tassel Flower: Held in great repute as a poultice for cuts, bruises, cancer, to draw out the blood or poisonous matter. The bruised leaf is bound over the spot and frequently removed. The dry powdered leaf was formerly used to sprinkle over food like salt. Dispensatory not; Not named.
    14. Â’talĭ Kȗlĭ’ = “it climbs the mountain.”Aralia quinquefolia Ginseng or “sang:” Decoction for root drank for headache, cramps, etc., and for female troubles; chewed root blown on spot for pains in the side. The Cherokees sell large quantities of sang to the traders for 50 cents per pound, nearly equivalent to two days wages, a fact which doubtless increased their idea of importance. Dispensatory: “The extraordinary medicinal virtues formally to ginseng had no other existence than in the imagination of the Chinese. It is little more than a demulcent, and in this country is not employed as a medicine,” The Chinese name, ginseng, is said to refer to the fancied resemblance of the root to a human figure, while in the Cherokee formulas it is addressed as the “great man” or “little man,” and the resemblance no doubt has much to do with the estimation in which it is held by both peoples.
    15. Û’tsatĭ Uwadsĭska – “fish scales,” from the shape of leaves – Thalictrum anemonoides- Meadow Rue; decoction of root drunk for diarrhea and vomiting. Dispensatory: Not names.
    16. K’kwě Ulasu’la = “partridge moccasin” – Cypripedium parviflorum Lady slipper: Decoction of root used for worms in children. In the liquid are placed some stalks of the common chickweed or purslane (Cerastium vulgatum) which, from the appearance of its red fleshy stalks, is supposed to have some connection with worms. Dispensatory: Described as “a gentle nervous stimulant” useful in diseases in which the nerves are especially affected. The other herb is not named.
    17. A’Hawi’ Akă’tă = “deer eye.” from the appearance of the flower – Rudbeckia fulgida – Cone Flower: Decoction of root drunk for flux and for some private diseases; also used as a wash for snake bites and swellings caused but (mythic) tsgăya or worms; also dropped into weak or inflamed eyes. This last is probably from the supposed connection between the eye and the flower resembling the eye. Dispensatory: Not named.
    18. Utĭstugi – Polygonatum multiflorum latifoliumSolomons Seal; root heated and bruised and applied as a poultice to remove an ulcerating swelling called tu’stĭ, resembling a boil or carbuncle. Dispensatory: This species acts like P. uniflorum, which is said to be emetic. In former times it was used externally in bruises, especially those about the eyes, in tumors, wounds, and cutaneous eruptions and was highly esteemed as a cosmetic. At present it is not employed, though recommended by Hermann as “a good remedy in gout and rheumatism.” This species in decoction has been found to produce “nausea, a cathartic effect and either diaphoresis or diuresis,” and is useful “as an internal remedy in piles, and externally in the form of decoction, in the affection of the skin resulting from the poisonous exhortations of other plants.”
    19. Ămădita’tĭ = “water dipper,” because water can be sucked up through its hollow stalk – Euphatorium purpureum Queen of the Meadow, Gravel Root: Root used in decoction with a somewhat similar plant called Ămădita’tĭ û tanu, or “large water dipper” (not identified) for difficult urination. Dispensatory: “Said to operate as a diuretic. Its vulgar name of gravel root indicates the popular estimation of its virtues.” The genus is described as a tonic, diaphoretic, and in large doses emetic and aperient.
    20. Yâna Utsěsta = “the bear lies on it”Aspidium acrostichoides – Shield Fern: Root decoction drunk to produce vomiting, and also used to rub on the skin, after scratching, for rheumatism – in both cases some other plant is added to the decoction; the warm decoction is also held in the mouth to relieve toothache. Dispensatory: Not named.

1One of the high peaks in the Smoky Mountains, on the Tennessee line, near Clingman’s dome.

* These statements are in the words of the original author, and not reflective of the beliefs of the transcriber.

2Haywood, John; Natural and Aboriginal History of East Tennessee, 267-8. Nashville, 1823.

3Ibid., p. 281.

*The u shape on the I is upside down, but is an outdated character.

*The u shape on the I is upside down, but is an outdated character.

4Wood T. B., and F.: Dispensatory of the United States of America. 14th ed. Philadelphia, 1877.

5The Cherokee plant names here given are generic names, which are the names commonly used. In many cases the same name is applied to several species and is it is only necessary to distinguish between them that the Indians use what might be called specific names. Even then the descriptive term used serves to distinguish only the particular plants under discussion and the introduction of another variety bearing the same generic name would necessitate a new classification of species on a different basis, while hardly any two individuals would classify the species by some characteristics.

The Definitive Guide to Living with Hypothyroidism —> Part 2, Natural and Clinical Remedies for Hypothyroidism

The Definitive Guide to Living with Hypothyroidism

Part 2,
Natural and Clinical Remedies for Hypothyroidism

This is Part 2 of a longer Guide on Living with hypothyroidism. Please review Part 1 to the Definitive Guide to Living with Hypothyroidism Here.

Part 1 covers the basics of hypothyroidism that will help you to understand the remedies in this part 2, if you are not already familiar with the specifics of the disorder.

Clinical Treatments for Hypothyroidism

      Before Beginning Hormone Replacement Such as Levothyroxine, Dedicated Thyroid or Cytomel:

According to an abstract from PubMed, patients with central hypothyroidism should have other pituitary hormone levels tested before beginning any hormone treatment begins. More specifically “assessment of the hypothalamic-pituitry-adrenal axis”. This is because if hypocortisolism is present, it needs to be rectified before initiation of hormone treatment.

     Levothyroxine

       History of Levothyroxine-

Synthroid is a medication that comes in the form of levothyroxine (LT4) in sodium tablets, that has been used since the early 20th century. Crystalline thyroxine (T) was first isolated by biochemist Calvin Kendall of the Mayo Clinic in 1914.

In 1927 experimentation started with extracts from hog thyroids, when George Barger and Charles Harrington synthesized the hormone.

LT4 has been the second most used prescription for the last 10 years.

       How Levothyroxine works

If you have read Part 1 of this guide it should be fairly simple to understand how this drug works.

LT4 is a synthetic drug, that mimics the T4 hormone. With overt and central hypothyroidism this drug works simply by replacing the hormones your body is not producing.

Some doctors may prescribe T3 hormones as well, these come in the form of Cytomel. There is evidence that suggests LT4 and Cytomel should be taken together.

       Interactions

There are medications and supplements can worsen an under-active thyroid. Because of possible interactions Thyroid Advisor recommends taking LT4, four hours apart from any other drug or supplement, to avoid taking away from the effects of LT4. Medications with the effect of lowering the effectiveness of LT4 include sodium polystyrene sulfonate, antacids, colestipol, iron, and calcium supplements.

Your doctor should provide a list of drugs, herbal medicine, and non-prescription products that may interact with LT4. Some of these include but are not limited to blood thinners, sucroferric oxyhydroxide and digoxin.

       Side effects

Side effects with LT4 like most other medications do occur.

          Hair loss

When you begin to take LT4, hair loss may occur as your body adjusts to the hormones, typically this is only temporary, but may also continue indefinitely.

           Continued Effects of Hypothyroidism

If your body still struggles with low hormone levels after taking LT4, symptoms of hypothyroidism will likely still present themselves. Sore muscles, weight gain, slowed heartbeat, fatigue, weight gain, etc.

          Too Much Thyroid Hormone

Some instances of hyperthyroidism have occurred as a side effect of taking LT4. This happens when your body does not adjust properly to the higher levels of hormones in the body. Symptoms include; mood swings, headaches, shaking and sweating. More extreme conditions may occur that would require medical attention, these symptoms are swelling, chest pain, irregular heart beats and seizures.

          Allergies

Allergies occur, but rarely.

     Cytomel

        History of Cytomel

Like T4 and Levothyroxine, the history of Cytomel began with the early discoveries of Calvin Kendall’s isolation of the T hormone in 1914.

T3 was first discovered and synthesized in 1952 by Rosalind Pitt-Rivers and Jack Gross. They confirmed that this compound was more active than T and in 1956 the FDA approved liothyronine, synthetic T3.

        How Cytomel Works

Just as LT4 works by replacing T4 levels in the thyroid, Cytomel simply works by replacing the missing T3 hormone in those afflicted with hypothyroidism.

There is a bit of controversy as to what the best drug for hypothyroidism is. Though the main of the medical industry finds that LT4 alone is sufficient for treating hypothyroidism, there is a debate as to whether Cytomel is better, or should be taken with LT4.

Though the body can normally convert T4 into T3, in those with hypothyroidism this may no longer be true.

T3 is more active than T4, and may have a greater effect on those with hypothyroidis.

       Interactions

Serious interactions can arise from medications that affect iodine in the body or radioactive iodine in general.

More common interactions can occur with drugs such as blood thinners and others, be sure to get a full list from your doctor.

Cytomel can also interact with conditions like diabetes, seizures, thyrotoxicosis, adrenal insufficiency, and cardiovascular disease.

       Side Effects

Like with LT4 hair loss can occur, but it is usually temporary while your body adjusts to the hormones. Other side effects are largely the same as with T4

Side effects largely arise from having thyroid hormone levels that are too high including headaches, mood changes, sensitivity to heat, diarrhea, menstrual changes, and increased sweating. Allergies do occasionally occur.

     Desiccated Thyroid

        History

George Murray introduced the first recorded preparation of desiccated (DT) thyroid. One of his patients was suffering from Myxedema, a severe form of hypothyroidism. By making an extract of a sheep’s thyroid and pounding it into a powder, he was able to inject it into his patient.

The effect was not immediate, but her symptoms did soon disappear, and she continued treatment for 52 more years til’ passing at the age of 91.

His findings spurred a use in animal extracts to treat hypothyroidism around the world.

Because of the high cost of vaccines and the requirement of a doctors assistance to administer, soon manufacturers developed tablets of DT powder instead.

More on the History HERE

       Sources of Dedicated Thyroid

It is suspected that porcine (pig) derived DT is stronger than that of bovine (cow) or sheep. I however will insert my religious views here, touching the body of a dead pig, much less eating one is forbidden in any major religion, and is specifically advised against in Bible, Torah and Koran. It is my religious assertion that you should see if bovine or sheep DT works for you, and many people do.

If you decide DT is for you give Throvanz a try, it is a DT derived from cows in New Zealand whose cows are pasture raised and free from growth hormones. Throvanz is available here.

       Interactions and Side Effects

As with any other medicine or supplements be sure to consult with your health care provider, especially if you are medications. Side effects are largely similar to LT4 and Cytomel.

Most interactions occur with other thyroid medications are caused by too much thyroid hormone.

Allergies do sometimes occur.

Natural Remedies for Hypothyroidism

     Ashwagandha

Ashwagandha also known as Indian Ginseng is an adaptogenic herb. It stands 2 to 3 feet tall, and produces green flowers which give way to orange berries.

One of the herbs of Ayurvedic medicine, Ashwagandha has a long history of use. It has been used to alleviate stress, boost the immune system, and promote sleep.

Ashwagandha may be an effective herbal remedy for helping alleviate hyperthyroidism. Its properties can balance hormone production of the thyroid. As an adaptogenic herb, Ashwagandha can balance hormones in an under active thyroid, and has properties that can balance hormones in those with hyperthyroidism as well.

Ashwagandha has a proven to be able to stimulate the production of T4. In 2014, a study conducted of 60 patients suffering from bipolar disorder found that Ashwagandha increased production of T4 and stabilized levels of TSH.

Besides its ability to stimulate T4 production, scientists also believe that Ashwagandha can help those suffering from hyperthyroidism by alleviating inflammation, improving mood and its nervine (nerve protecting) properties.

      Bladderwrack

More commonly known as Kelp, Bladderwrack may be beneficial to those with hypothyroidism. Commonly used to treat thyroid disorders in pill form, kelp is typically taken in capsule, at 600 mg per day, with food and water.

Kelp has shown an ability to counteract the weight gain associated with hyperthyroidism, by helping you to lose weight.

One thing is undeniable about kelp, and that is its high levels of Iodine. Kelp is one of the most abundant sources of natural iodine available. Iodine as mentioned throughout this guide, is essential for proper thyroid function. More on Iodine in Part 1.

Kelp can also alleviate inflammation in the thyroid through using a complex carbohydrate known as fucoidan. Fucodian is a strong anti- inflammatory used in many medications, including those for broken bones and sore muscles.

      Panax Ginseng

Panax ginseng, or Korean ginseng is well known for its amazing benefits including boosting levels of energy, supporting the immune system and boosting overall health. Panax ginseng may improve the daily lives of those with hypothyroidism. Though no specific studies link Panax to stimulated thyroid hormone production at this time, it is thought to promote overall thyroid health, and may prevent hypothyroid disorders before they start.

Panax can help those with hypothyroidism by providing a boost in energy and strengthening the overall body. This enables the body to deal with stress, and other immune disorders, more efficiently.

     Turmeric

Turmeric is a yellow herb that is in the ginger family, and has healing benefits for a variety of issues. Traditionally used in Ayurvedic medicine, turmeric has an aspirin like compound called currcumin. Currcumin is a powerful anti-inflammatory, that is also mildly pain relieving, and can prevent clotting in the blood by thinning it out. Turmeric is great for all around health and may make the lives of someone that is afflicted with hypothyroidism a bit less painful, until the thyroid hormones balance back out.

Dr. Izabella suggests that Turmeric can benefit those with Hashimoto’s. Inflammation is a condition that is always present in Hashimoto’s. Gut health permeability has been found as a common factor in all autoimmune diseases. There are also cases of Hashimoto’s caused by heavy metal toxicity. Not only does Turmeric provide anti-inflammatory properties, it has been used to improve gut health for 1000’s of years, and may also help to detoxify heavy metals from the body.

END PART 2

Cover Photo Compliments of Calum Lewis on Unsplash

STAY TUNED, This is Part 2 of a larger article on living with hypothyroidism, approximately 3 more parts will follow. Next week I will be adding more information on hypothyroidism including herbal remedies in more detail, important vitamins to consider when dealing with thyroid issues and some breaking clinical studies.

If you have not already be sure to check out Part 1

Citations-

  1. “Synthroid/Levothyroxine Complete Overview – History, Usage, Dosage, Interactions, Side Effects.” Thyroid Advisor, 15 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/synthroid-and-levothyroxine-complete-overview/.
  2. “Cytomel Oral : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing.” WebMD, WebMD, http://www.webmd.com/drugs/2/drug-7715/cytomel-oral/details.
  3. “Cytomel: History, Medical Use, Dosage, Side Effects and More.” Thyroid Advisor, 22 July 2017, thyroidadvisor.com/cytomel-history-medical-use-dosage-side-effects/.
  4. Wentz, Dr. Izabella, et al. “Turmeric For Your Thyroid and Hashimoto’s – Dr. Izabella Wentz.” DR. IZABELLA WENTZ, PHARM D, 27 July 2017, thyroidpharmacist.com/articles/turmeric-for-your-thyroid-and-hashimotos/.

 

 

 

How to Prepare Chaga, the Right Way

Many people often wonder how to prepare chaga mushroom, but almost everyone is preparing it in a way that destroys a crucial healing compound! Though there are many potential ways to prepare chaga, only one method for preparing chaga allows you to get ALL of the healing compounds held within this powerful medicinal mushroom.

Chaga mushroom has been a health craze for the last few years, but unfortunately due to improper preparation most people aren’t getting its full healing potential. The hot water extract may be more effective at removing some of the healing benefits of the mushroom, but…. Here’s the thing, the standard hot water preparation destroys one of the main healing components that chaga provides, and should never be used to prepare chaga, at least not before using the proper preparation method, more on that later.

So Why is the Cold Water Extraction Method Better?

Perhaps the most recognized active component of Chaga, is an enzyme known as Superoxide Dismutas (SOD) a powerful antioxidant, which is found in chaga at levels not found anywhere else in nature.

So whats the big deal?

ALL enzymes are denatured, essentially destroyed by heat. Therefore doing a hot water extraction of chaga destroys perhaps its most beneficial compound. Its that simple, why would you prepare a medicinal mushroom in a way that destroys one of its key compounds? 

Extracts of SOD are sold as an extract for TOP DOLLAR, why would you use a process that would destroy a key compound.

The Benefits of SOD lost, from Boiling Chaga

    • According to University Health News, SOD is “arguably the bodies most crucial antioxidant”
    • SOD, can destroy the most highly reactive free radicals known to exist called, superoxide radicals.
    • Superoxide radicals are one of the most abundant reactive oxygen species (ROS).  SOD enzymes are a crucial healing tool that catalyzes and breaks down ROS and is essential to maintaining oxide levels.

 

How to Prepare Chaga, the Right Way.

Preparing chaga the right way is very simple, too simple, like so easy it’s crazy, like why is everyone working so hard to destroy the benefits of a great medicine!!!

What you will need to prepare chaga-

  • Handful of chaga in 1.5-3 inch chunks or smaller.
  • A standard Mason Jar or other glass vessel
  • Water

Take a hand full of chaga for a 1 quart mason jar (more depending on size of jar), place it in the jar. Fill the jar with cool to warm water. As long as its below 118 degrees Fahrenheit you’re in the clear. Wait 24 – 48 hours, or until the water turns dark and you can barely see through to the glass. That’s it!

 

 

Repeat until the water no longer turns dark, and then continue on to the standard boiling process, if you wish. On average you can get 2 cool water extracts and then several hot water extracts before discarding the chaga. A little bit really goes a long way.

If the water doesn’t get dark after 24 hours, add a little more. Be sure not to leave the mason jar out for too long without refrigerating.

As a side note, another common mistake people make when preparing chaga is scraping off the dark outer “bark”, this preparation method gets rid of another key component in chaga that is rare in nature. The outer shell of chaga contains the highest concentration of melanin known to exist in nature. Scraping off the outer shell not only gets rid of all that melanin, its time consuming, and totally unnecessary.

I hope this process can benefit your life, and give you more for your chaga buck.

 

3D Printed Organs are on the Horizon, and they are Made with Horseradish?

3D Organ Printing Technology Break Through by Osaka University

One has to wonder what age we are in when 3D printed organs are on the verge of becoming a reality. Yup, that’s right bio-printers are a thing, they are already making skin, and vascular tissue. Current technology only allows for flat or hollow tissue to be printed, these processes will often use the organ recipients own cells to produce the living tissue.

But, new research into inkjet organ printing, yes “inkjet organ printing” may have made it easier to print larger 3d organs. Though there are still several factors that need to be over come to print large 3d organs, they appear to be right around the corner.

Scientists at Osaka University have discovered an improved method for making printing materials stick together as they drop one drop of material onto another. The researchers have developed an enzyme-driven method to glue biological ink together. This breakthrough will allow a larger range of cell types to be used in the bio-printing process.

The New 3d Organ Printing Process Uses an Enzyme Found in Horseradish

Previous printing methods had used a binding material called sodium alginate, a polysaccharid extract from brown seaweed. This binding material, according to the researchers limited the range of cells that could be used. The new binding agent uses an enzyme called horseradish peroxidase. When combined with hydrogen peroxide in a hydrogelation process, this enzyme can be used to bind groups of bio-printing material together.

In the words of the Lead author, Shinji Sakai “Printing any kind of tissue structure is a complex process. The bio-ink must have low enough viscosity to flow through the inkjet printer, but also needs to rapidly form a highly viscose gel-like structure when printed. Our new approach meets these requirements while avoiding sodium alginate. In fact, the polymer we used offers excellent potential for tailoring the scaffold material for specific purposes.”

Like it or not, 3d bio-printed organs are quickly becoming a reality. Stranger still they are using simple inkjet technology to build organs out of biological inks, drop by drop.

In my opinion it would be better to take care of the organs you have in the first place. The implications of these organs will not be known for decades to come. Though this is an undeniably interesting breakthrough, you have to wonder what time it really is.

Direct Link to the Research from Osaka University

Citations-

Osaka University. “Growing organs a few ink drops at a time: Researchers refine method of making bio-ink droplets stick to each other, enabling 3D printing of highly complex biological structures with a wide variety of cell types using inkjet printers.” ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 27 December 2017. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/12/171227100040.htm>.

The Definitive Guide to Living with Hypothyroidism (Part 1)

Including
Natural Remedies for Living with Hypothyroidism
(coming soon!)

Hypothyroidism, is a devastating illness that can slowly wear away at the fabric of your being. For those fortunate to not be afflicted with the disease yet there are steps you can take to avoid being afflicted with the condition. However for those already afflicted consent fatigue, dry skin, memory lapses and even depression can make it difficult to get through each and every day. What is Hypothyroidism, how can it be prevented, and how can you make life better if you are already diagnosed?

This is a comprehensive guide designed to help anyone looking for information on thyroid disease, in order that they may learn and comprehend exactly what is happening, in the hopes it may aid you in your own recovery. Often hypothyroidism remains misdiagnosed, or totally unnoticed for years, knowing what hypothyroidism is may save you years of misdiagnosis, and prevent you from further suffering.

May this guide benefit your life, and guide you to a healthier life.

Hypothyroidism Explained

What is the Thyroid Gland?

To understand what hypothyroidism is it is important to first know what the thyroid gland is and what it does. The thyroid gland is an endocrine gland that is located at the front of the windpipe, at the front of the neck. The thyroid is made up of 2 lobes.

The cartilage above the thyroid is called the thyroid cartilage, it is the largest cartilage which makes up the larynx, or the voice box. In men the thyroid cartilage is what forms the Adam’s Apple.

Functions of the thyroid gland-

The thyroid gland produces hormones which are then secreted into the blood. From the blood they are carried into every tissue in the body. The thyroid keeps the body warm, helps it utilize energy, and regulates functions of the heart, brain and other organs.

Hormones produced in the thyroid

The two main hormones produced in the thyroid T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (Thyroxine).

T3 and T4 regulate metabolism, heart rate, and body temperature. Calcitonin is also produced in the thyroid and is in charge of regulating the level of phosphate and calcium in the blood.

Thyroid hormone secretion is regulated by a hormone simply called Thyroid Stimulating Hormone or TSH, which is released by the pituitary gland, which is located in your brain. TSH stimulates the production of the T3 and T4 hormones.

Iodine and the hormone production in the thyroid

Iodine is an essential element for producing the hormones that the thyroid produces. Without this element the thyroid can not function properly. Iodine is naturally occurring in seafood, and plants grown in iodine rich soils. Iodine was added to salt in 1924 in the form of potassium iodide. Iodine can also be taken in the form of liquid supplements. Iodine deficiency is one of the largest causes of hypothyroidism.

What is Hypothyroidism?

Hypothyroidism simply put is an under active thyroid. The thyroid has stopped producing the amount of hormones needed to regulate functions in the body. There are 3 classes of hypothyroidism subclinical, overt, and central, more on each of those in the diagnosis section.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism-

The symptoms of hypothyroidism can easily be confused with many other illnesses. The most common symptoms are feeling cold, weight gain, fatigue, irregular periods, and dry skin.

Diagnosing hypothyroidism-

Hypothyroidism is diagnosed through blood work tests. The most common test, is done by testing for TSH in the blood. This is considered the best test as elevated levels of thyroid stimulating hormones can suggest that the thyroid is not producing enough hormones, or is not reacting to the TSH as expected. A second TSH test will often follow weeks latter to confirm the diagnosis.

If the blood work reveals elevated TSH levels, often times the doctor will obtain the levels of free T4 is the Blood. Free T4 is simply T4 that is free flowing in the blood and not bound to any proteins. Testing for T3 is discouraged by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE). Once the T4 results are received your healthcare provider may make a diagnosis.

Table of Test Results

TSH Levels

T4 Levels

Interpretation

Normal

Normal

Normal Thyroid Function

Normal/Low

Low

Central hypothyroidism

Elevated

Low

Overt hypothyroidism

Elevated

Normal

Sub-clinical hypothyroidism

Note that regulate levels are not necessarily indicative of a healthy thyroid, as central hypothyroidism can occur even when TSH levels are normal.

Other tests may be recommend by different physicians, for example mildly elevated levels of creatine kinase enzyme and liver enzymes in the blood stream have also been attributed to hypothyroidism. Levels of these enzymes normally return to normal when the disease has been fully treated. There are several other pituitary hormones that should also be tested for in cases of overt and sub-clinical HT. This is specifically important, because when hypocortisolism is present, it should be treated prior to beginning thyroid hormone replacement. .

     Central hypothyroidism

Central Hypothyroidism (CH) is the condition of hypothyroidism caused by an under active pituitary or insufficient production of TSH. When TSH levels are in the normal to low range, but T4 levels are low, this an indication of possible central hypothyroidism. CH is caused by many different factors including brain trauma and autoimmune disease, the underlying causes of CH can very greatly. More information on Central Hypothyroidism Here.

     Sub-clinical hypothyroidism

Sub-clinical hypothyroidism SH is the grade of hypothyroidism that arrises when T4 levels are normal, but TSH levels are elevated. This type of hypothyroidism can be caused by Hasimoto’s disease( a type of thyroid inflammation), thyroid hormone resistance, and other forms of thyroiditis (thyroid inflammation caused by autoimmune disorders).

According to PubMed sub-clinical hypothyroidism can evolve into clinical hypothyroidism if left untreated.

    Overt hypothyroidism

Overt hypothyroidism (OH) is the grade of HT that is diagnosed by elevated levels of TSH and low levels of T4.

Preventing Hypothyroidism-

One of the simplest ways to avoid hypothyroidism is to maintain a healthy level of iodine in your diet. Childhood hypothyroidism was once endemic, this was largely eliminated by adding iodine to commonly used foods, such as table salt. Iodine deficiency is certainly the leading cause of hypothyroidism and maintaining a healthy intake of iodine can help you avoid this hypothyroidism. Iodine deficiency is once again on the rise in the west as people intake less salt, and by people seeking to avoid processed food. Be aware of the amount of iodine that is in your diet and supplement if necessary. The American Thyroid Association has a recommendation of 150 micrograms of supplemental iodine daily.

Woman that are pregnant or breastfeeding require almost 67% more iodine than non pregnant women. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) pregnant and breastfeeding women are recommended to take 250 micrograms of iodine daily.

Though Iodine may be the main preventative, there may be several other ways to avoid Hypothroidism in general:

  1. Getting an X-Ray? Ask for a thyroid collar- Each time you need to get an x-ray be sure to ask for a thyroid collar. This collar specifically protects the thyroid from x-ray radiation

  2. Stop smoking!!!  Yep, just another reason to quit smoking. As you well know cigarettes are full of chemicals, and your body does not react well to them. Thiocyanate in particular is dangerous for the thyroid, and may trigger thyroid disease.

  3. Avoid Soy! Soy is not as Healthy as most people think. It can cause autoimmune responses in the body, which if occurring frequently can lead to a variety of autoimmune diseases, including hypothyroidism

  4. Selenium is a Superfood for the Thyroid- Maintaining healthy levels of selenium can prevent thyroiditis and autoimmune diseases associated with some thyroid conditions. Selenium levels are also associated with reduced levels of thyroid antibodies. Brazil nuts are a rare food that is rich in selenium add them to your diet.

  5. Use Potassium Iodide- I can’t state this enough! Potassium iodide is essential to avoiding thyroid disorders. Potassium iodide can also reduce risks of disease in the thyroid from exposure to radiation.

  6. Avoid Fluoride- Fluoride was once commonly used effectively as a treatment for hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid), This means it reduces thyroid activity, which is clearly not what you want to happen if you have hypothyroidism.  Fluoride is contained in most bottled and city water, it is also contained in almost all toothpastes and mouth washes.

  1. Do your own Research! It can be all too easy to rely solely on the advice of your doctor, but they are low on time, and may not have the time, or energy to learn all they can on the wide range of conditions they have to deal with on a daily basis. The internet is a great tool and there is a well spring of information at your fingertips. Just be wise about your sources, there is a wealth of information to be found. This article is a good start.

STAY TUNED, this is part one of a larger article called “The definitive guide to living with Hypothyroidism”. Next week I will be adding more information on hypothyroidism including standard medical treatments, Hashimotos explained, and alternative medicines used for alleviating symptoms.  Further posts will include; breaking clinical studies, as well as diet and lifestyle choices you can take to make life with hypothyroidism a bit easier.

—————-

Disclaimer– the content is not intended to treat, diagnosis or cure any disease. This article is not to be construed as medical advice.

Citations-

1. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. “Hypothyroidism.” RACGP – Hypothyroidism – Investigation and management, The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners, http://www.racgp.org.au/afp/2012/august/hypothyroidism.

2. “Thyroid gland and thyroid hormones.” MyDr.com.au – trusted Australian health and medicines information, http://www.mydr.com.au/health-images/thyroid-gland-and-thyroid-hormones.

3. Thyroiditis: Facts About Symptoms of This Condition.” MedicineNet, http://www.medicinenet.com/thyroiditis/article.htm.

4. Khandelwal, D, and N Tandon. “Overt and subclinical hypothyroidism: who to treat and how.” Drugs., U.S. National Library of Medicine, 1 Jan. 2012, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22191793.

5. Mary Shomon | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD. “Ways You Can Prevent a Thyroid Condition Now.” Verywell, http://www.verywell.com/things-to-prevent-a-thyroid-condition-3233225.